Twin Flames and A’nó:wara Dance Theatre among the artists at this year’s Prismatic Arts Festival

The annual festival showcases Indigenous artists and artists of colour in music, theatre, dance, visual arts, and spoken word.

The multidisciplinary dance theatre piece Sky Dancers: Bridges explores the impact of the Quebec bridge disaster of 1907, which killed 33 ironworkers from the Mohawk community of Kahnawake.
The multidisciplinary dance theatre piece Sky Dancers: Bridges explores the impact of the Quebec bridge disaster of 1907, which killed 33 ironworkers from the Mohawk community of Kahnawake.

The annual Prismatic Arts Festival returns to venues in downtown Halifax online from September 28 through October 10, showcasing Indigenous artists and artists of colour in music, theatre, dance, visual arts, and spoken word.

This year, artists scheduled to appear with live performances include the multi-award-winning Canadian Indigenous duo Twin Flames and Montreal-based A’nó:wara Dance Theatre.

As part of their first tour of Atlantic Canada, Twin Flames stops at The Carleton on October 3. Made up of husband-and-wife team Jaaji and Chelsey June, the duo tells stories of courage and survival written in English, Inuttitut, and French.

“What we hope to achieve through our music is unity and celebration of different cultures coming together,” says June in a media release. “Kind of like singing around a campfire or your famous kitchen parties; that is how we hope to make our audiences feel.”

Award-winning duo folk artists Twin Flames perform at this year's Prismatic Arts Festival. 
Award-winning duo folk artists Twin Flames perform at this year’s Prismatic Arts Festival.

On the September 30th National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, Live Art Dance presents the multidisciplinary work Sky Dancers: Bridges by A’nó:wara Dance Theatre.

A tribute to the 33 men from the Mohawk territory of Kahnawake who died in 1907 when the world’s longest cantilever bridge collapsed, the piece was created by choreographer Barbara Kaneratonni Diabo. Originally from Kahnawake, Diabo has a very personal connection to the tragedy as her great-grandfather was one of the men who died on the bridge that day.

Other highlights include Juno Award-winning Digging Roots, who play a free show on October 2, and playwright and poet Clyde A Wright presents his new play We Were Here at Neptune Theatre on October 8-10.

Online, the festival will present a free virtual show live on YouTube and Facebook on September 29, featuring performances from Son Latino, Illest Omen, Jacques Mindreau, and Rebecca Thomas.

In addition to the public performances, Prismatic will also host industry events, including a conference and masterclass series.

The 2021 Prismatic Arts Festival takes place online and in-person from September 28 through October 10. Visit prismaticfestival.com for tickets and information.

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